1/19/2007 3:57:40 AM www.hindustantimes.com

WHO SAYS Sanskrit is a dead language? It’s the most live script on your ‘fingertips’—it is contemporary because it’s computer-friendly.

That was the sentiment of the Sanskrit scholars who gathered at the Rashtriya Sanskrit Sansthan annual function on Wednesday.

The function saw a series of lectures on various aspects of Sanskrit language. Old claims that Sanskrit is the ‘mother of all languages’ got the backseat with a majority of scholars proving that the so-called dead language is back in business. Some speakers even described Sanskrit as the language of the 22nd century.

Vice Chancellor of Jagatguru Ramanandacharya Rajasthan Sanskrit University Prof KV Ramkrishnamacharyulu speaking on the contribution of Panini Grammar in the computer natural processing said in computers, translation method cannot work rather the understanding of the basic language and the converted (L1-L2) is essential as the computer accepts the exact instructions for conversion.

Another lecture in the series was delivered by a renowned Sanskrit scholar Prof Ram Karan Sharma on Vyas Kalidasyoh Kavyatatvam. Sharma was the first consultant of the Government of India on the Sanskrit language.
He stated some comparison and equalities in the writings of both the writers seem original and comes under the category of epics. The fish is considered as the symbol of Omen. The Mahabharat deals with the story of agitation and struggles while Abhigyan Shakuntalam, Raghuvansham deal with the politeness and messages.

In his presidential address, Acharya Ram Karan Sharma mentioned that in future Sanskrit language would go hand-in-hand with modernity and it is sure that 22nd century would be the century of Sanskrit language.

Later the annual function was organised in which the students of the institute presented cultural programmes. The principal of the Sansthan, Prof Surendra Jha presided the function and gave away the prizes to the winning students in sports and other competitions.

Sanskrit to bounce back as 22nd century language